Testimony C. Reeves Nashville TN “Our roof needed immediate attention…Woodall took care of it in no time…” …Great Job!
Nashville Roofing Company

ROOFING TYPES

Woodall Roofing Contractor

Roof Types

Roofing Products

Roofing Materials

Roof Types

A Variety of Roofing Structures and Styles Hip Roof Unlike a gable roof where all sides angle down to meet the walls of the home, a hip roof doesn’t have flat sides. Hip roofs are more difficult to build but offer the benefit of making building the home walls simpler as they will all be the same height. Further unlike gable roofs, hip roofs provide excellent support in high wind climates including those with the potential for hurricanes or other severe weather, because the hip roof style contains better internal bracing. Hip Roof Variations: Simple hip roof –  A ridge covers a portion of the roof creating two triangular and two polygonal sides. Generally, this is the most common hip roof style. Pyramid hip roof -  Resembling a pyramid, this style has four triangular sides equal in length that meet at one place at the top of the roof. Cross hipped roof – A cross hipped roof resembles placing two hipped roof structures together with where the sections meet forming a seam called a valley. Half hipped roof – Two sides, which are shortened, create this very average hip roof. Dutch gable roof – With the offer of increased internal roof space and potentially greater aesthetic appeal, a Dutch gable roof is a combination of a traditional gable and hip roof style. Typically, the gable in this roof style is at the end of a ridge. Bonnet Roof An uncommon roof style occasionally called a kicked eaves roof; bonnet roofs tend to be considered a roof enhancement. A bonnet roof is typically most seen in French Vernacular construction and has two slopes on all four sides. The bottom slope hangs over the house and typically covers a porch. This style could be compared to a hip roof style with some alterations. Gable Roof Gable Roof Variations: Side gable roof – Highly cost-effective, which makes it one of the most popular styles. Front gable roof – Typically used for Cape Cod and Colonial style homes, the gabled end rests at the front of the home or entrance. Cross gabled roof – Also used for Cape Cod as well as Tudor style homes, cross gabled roofs consist of two gable roof pieces connected together at a right angle with the ridges being perpendicular to one another. Height, pitch or length may differ from each other in cross-gabled roofs. Dutch gable roof - With the offer of increased internal roof space and potentially greater aesthetic appeal, a Dutch gable roof is a combination of a traditional gable and hip roof style. Typically, the gable in this roof style is at the end of a ridge. Mansard Roof Sometimes called a French roof, mansard roofs have two very different slopes on either side. The upper part of the mansard style roof has a slope just low enough for water runoff while the lower portion has dramatically angled inclines usually with dormers. Mansard roofs provide an abundance of extra attic space called the garret, which can also be used as an extra story to the home or a bonus room. This roof type does not work well in areas that have heavy snowfall due to the lower slope not providing enough bracing. Shed Roof Many times shed roofs are associated with sheds, porches, additions to homes and remodeling. Shed roofs are often the least expensive roofs to build. Further, they are generally easier as well. Sometimes referred to as a lean-to, a shed roof usually is a single roof face sloping down the whole of a building or addition to a building. Gable Roof With two roof surfaces of the same dimension, inclined back-to-back, gable roofs have a point at the top and resemble a triangle. As one of the most popular choices when making a decision about home roofing, a gable roof is an excellent option for most areas. However, gable roofs are the most likely roof type to suffer damage and do not function well in high wind environments. This is often due to improper bracing of the end wall. Salt Box Roof Very similar to a gable roof style, early Americans created the saltbox style to accommodate the need for more space in often-overcrowded colonial homes. The saltbox style consist of adding a one story shed roof or gable roof to the back of a one or two story house, which saves both money and building material. Gambrel Roof Similar to the mansard roof, the Gambrel roof had two different slopes on either side. Additionally, like the mansard, Gambrel roofs have a lower top slope with a very heavily angled bottom slope. However, the Gambrel roof only uses this on two sides of the home not all four. Flat Roofs Popular in dry climates, flat roofs, sometimes called low slope roofs, only have a slight incline for water shedding. They are inexpensive to build, as they require less material. However, despite the initial investment being low, flat roofs require more maintenance and often need re-roofing within 10- 20 years while pitched roofs can last up to 25-50 years. Common Flat Roof Materials: Green Roofs Roll Roofing Built up roof/Tar & Gravel Modified Bitumen Rubber Membrane Metal Sheets Top    

Roofing Products

                                                    Terry Woodall Roofing uses the highest quality roofing products available on the market today. Here are links to some of our roofing products:             Top    

Roofing Materials

Roofing Contractor Materials Our Roofing Material Options include: o Shingle Roofing o Wood Shingles and Shakes o Metal Roof shingles o Asphalt Shingles Roofing o Rubber Roof Shingles & Whole Roof o Steel Roofing o Slate Roofing o Roll Roofing o Aluminum Roofing o Copper Roofing o Tile Roofing o Fiberglass Roofing o Plastic Roofing o Concrete Roofing o Tin Roofing o Corrugated Roofing o Solar Roofing o Tar & Gravel Roofing Top Call Today for a Free Quote:  (615) 300-6005
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Woodall Roofing Contractors of Nashville TN | Copyright 2016 All Rights Reserved Dotdancer.com
ADDRESS Woodall Roofing Contractors 805 52nd Ave. N Nashville, TN 37209
CONTACT 615-300-6005 Fax:  615-352-3644

Call (615) 300-6005

ROOFING TYPES

Woodall Roofing Contractors | Copyright 2016  All Rights Reserved To the Top CALL US
Roof Types Roofing Products Roofing Materials Roof Types A Variety of Roofing Structures and Styles Hip Roof Unlike a gable roof where all sides angle down to meet the walls of the home, a hip roof doesn’t have flat sides. Hip roofs are more difficult to build but offer the benefit of making building the home walls simpler as they will all be the same height. Further unlike gable roofs, hip roofs provide excellent support in high wind climates including those with the potential for hurricanes or other severe weather, because the hip roof style contains better internal bracing. Hip Roof Variations: Simple hip roof –  A ridge covers a portion of the roof creating two triangular and two polygonal sides. Generally, this is the most common hip roof style. Pyramid hip roof -  Resembling a pyramid, this style has four triangular sides equal in length that meet at one place at the top of the roof. Cross hipped roof – A cross hipped roof resembles placing two hipped roof structures together with where the sections meet forming a seam called a valley. Half hipped roof – Two sides, which are shortened, create this very average hip roof. Dutch gable roof – With the offer of increased internal roof space and potentially greater aesthetic appeal, a Dutch gable roof is a combination of a traditional gable and hip roof style. Typically, the gable in this roof style is at the end of a ridge. Bonnet Roof An uncommon roof style occasionally called a kicked eaves roof; bonnet roofs tend to be considered a roof enhancement. A bonnet roof is typically most seen in French Vernacular construction and has two slopes on all four sides. The bottom slope hangs over the house and typically covers a porch. This style could be compared to a hip roof style with some alterations. Gable Roof Gable Roof Variations: Side gable roof – Highly cost-effective, which makes it one of the most popular styles. Front gable roof – Typically used for Cape Cod and Colonial style homes, the gabled end rests at the front of the home or entrance. Cross gabled roof – Also used for Cape Cod as well as Tudor style homes, cross gabled roofs consist of two gable roof pieces connected together at a right angle with the ridges being perpendicular to one another. Height, pitch or length may differ from each other in cross-gabled roofs. Dutch gable roof - With the offer of increased internal roof space and potentially greater aesthetic appeal, a Dutch gable roof is a combination of a traditional gable and hip roof style. Typically, the gable in this roof style is at the end of a ridge. Mansard Roof Sometimes called a French roof, mansard roofs have two very different slopes on either side. The upper part of the mansard style roof has a slope just low enough for water runoff while the lower portion has dramatically angled inclines usually with dormers. Mansard roofs provide an abundance of extra attic space called the garret, which can also be used as an extra story to the home or a bonus room. This roof type does not work well in areas that have heavy snowfall due to the lower slope not providing enough bracing. Shed Roof Many times shed roofs are associated with sheds, porches, additions to homes and remodeling. Shed roofs are often the least expensive roofs to build. Further, they are generally easier as well. Sometimes referred to as a lean-to, a shed roof usually is a single roof face sloping down the whole of a building or addition to a building. Gable Roof With two roof surfaces of the same dimension, inclined back-to-back, gable roofs have a point at the top and resemble a triangle. As one of the most popular choices when making a decision about home roofing, a gable roof is an excellent option for most areas. However, gable roofs are the most likely roof type to suffer damage and do not function well in high wind environments. This is often due to improper bracing of the end wall. Salt Box Roof Very similar to a gable roof style, early Americans created the saltbox style to accommodate the need for more space in often-overcrowded colonial homes. The saltbox style consist of adding a one story shed roof or gable roof to the back of a one or two story house, which saves both money and building material. Gambrel Roof Similar to the mansard roof, the Gambrel roof had two different slopes on either side. Additionally, like the mansard, Gambrel roofs have a lower top slope with a very heavily angled bottom slope. However, the Gambrel roof only uses this on two sides of the home not all four. Flat Roofs Popular in dry climates, flat roofs, sometimes called low slope roofs, only have a slight incline for water shedding. They are inexpensive to build, as they require less material. However, despite the initial investment being low, flat roofs require more maintenance and often need re-roofing within 10-20 years while pitched roofs can last up to 25-50 years. Common Flat Roof Materials: Green Roofs Roll Roofing Built up roof/Tar & Gravel Modified Bitumen Rubber Membrane Metal Sheets Top Roofing Products                                                     Terry Woodall Roofing uses the highest quality roofing products available on the market today. Here are links to some of our roofing products:             Top Roofing Materials Roofing Contractor Materials Our Roofing Material Options include: o Shingle Roofing o Wood Shingles and Shakes o Metal Roof shingles o Asphalt Shingles Roofing o Rubber Roof Shingles & Whole Roof o Steel Roofing o Slate Roofing o Roll Roofing o Aluminum Roofing o Copper Roofing o Tile Roofing o Fiberglass Roofing o Plastic Roofing o Concrete Roofing o Tin Roofing o Corrugated Roofing o Solar Roofing o Tar & Gravel Roofing Top
(615) 300-6005
Testimony C. Reeves Nashville TN “Our roof needed immediate attention…Woodall took care of it in no time…” …Great Job!

ROOF TYPES

Locations

We serve all of Middle Tennessee from these locations:

Roof Types

Roofing Products

Roofing Materials

Roof Types

A Variety of Roofing Structures and Styles Hip Roof Unlike a gable roof where all sides angle down to meet the walls of the home, a hip roof doesn’t have flat sides. Hip roofs are more difficult to build but offer the benefit of making building the home walls simpler as they will all be the same height. Further unlike gable roofs, hip roofs provide excellent support in high wind climates including those with the potential for hurricanes or other severe weather, because the hip roof style contains better internal bracing. Hip Roof Variations: Simple hip roof –  A ridge covers a portion of the roof creating two triangular and two polygonal sides. Generally, this is the most common hip roof style. Pyramid hip roof -  Resembling a pyramid, this style has four triangular sides equal in length that meet at one place at the top of the roof. Cross hipped roof – A cross hipped roof resembles placing two hipped roof structures together with where the sections meet forming a seam called a valley. Half hipped roof – Two sides, which are shortened, create this very average hip roof. Dutch gable roof – With the offer of increased internal roof space and potentially greater aesthetic appeal, a Dutch gable roof is a combination of a traditional gable and hip roof style. Typically, the gable in this roof style is at the end of a ridge. Bonnet Roof An uncommon roof style occasionally called a kicked eaves roof; bonnet roofs tend to be considered a roof enhancement. A bonnet roof is typically most seen in French Vernacular construction and has two slopes on all four sides. The bottom slope hangs over the house and typically covers a porch. This style could be compared to a hip roof style with some alterations. Gable Roof Gable Roof Variations: Side gable roof – Highly cost-effective, which makes it one of the most popular styles. Front gable roof – Typically used for Cape Cod and Colonial style homes, the gabled end rests at the front of the home or entrance. Cross gabled roof – Also used for Cape Cod as well as Tudor style homes, cross gabled roofs consist of two gable roof pieces connected together at a right angle with the ridges being perpendicular to one another. Height, pitch or length may differ from each other in cross-gabled roofs. Dutch gable roof - With the offer of increased internal roof space and potentially greater aesthetic appeal, a Dutch gable roof is a combination of a traditional gable and hip roof style. Typically, the gable in this roof style is at the end of a ridge. Mansard Roof Sometimes called a French roof, mansard roofs have two very different slopes on either side. The upper part of the mansard style roof has a slope just low enough for water runoff while the lower portion has dramatically angled inclines usually with dormers. Mansard roofs provide an abundance of extra attic space called the garret, which can also be used as an extra story to the home or a bonus room. This roof type does not work well in areas that have heavy snowfall due to the lower slope not providing enough bracing. Shed Roof Many times shed roofs are associated with sheds, porches, additions to homes and remodeling. Shed roofs are often the least expensive roofs to build. Further, they are generally easier as well. Sometimes referred to as a lean-to, a shed roof usually is a single roof face sloping down the whole of a building or addition to a building. Gable Roof With two roof surfaces of the same dimension, inclined back-to-back, gable roofs have a point at the top and resemble a triangle. As one of the most popular choices when making a decision about home roofing, a gable roof is an excellent option for most areas. However, gable roofs are the most likely roof type to suffer damage and do not function well in high wind environments. This is often due to improper bracing of the end wall. Salt Box Roof Very similar to a gable roof style, early Americans created the saltbox style to accommodate the need for more space in often-overcrowded colonial homes. The saltbox style consist of adding a one story shed roof or gable roof to the back of a one or two story house, which saves both money and building material. Gambrel Roof Similar to the mansard roof, the Gambrel roof had two different slopes on either side. Additionally, like the mansard, Gambrel roofs have a lower top slope with a very heavily angled bottom slope. However, the Gambrel roof only uses this on two sides of the home not all four. Flat Roofs Popular in dry climates, flat roofs, sometimes called low slope roofs, only have a slight incline for water shedding. They are inexpensive to build, as they require less material. However, despite the initial investment being low, flat roofs require more maintenance and often need re-roofing within 10-20 years while pitched roofs can last up to 25-50 years. Common Flat Roof Materials: Green Roofs Roll Roofing Built up roof/Tar & Gravel Modified Bitumen Rubber Membrane Metal Sheets Top    

Roofing Products

                                                    Terry Woodall Roofing uses the highest quality roofing products available on the market today. Here are links to some of our roofing products:             Top    

Roofing Materials

Roofing Contractor Materials Our Roofing Material Options include: o Shingle Roofing o Wood Shingles and Shakes o Metal Roof shingles o Asphalt Shingles Roofing o Rubber Roof Shingles & Whole Roof o Steel Roofing o Slate Roofing o Roll Roofing o Aluminum Roofing o Copper Roofing o Tile Roofing o Fiberglass Roofing o Plastic Roofing o Concrete Roofing o Tin Roofing o Corrugated Roofing o Solar Roofing o Tar & Gravel Roofing Top Call Today for a Free Quote:  (615) 300-6005
SOCIAL
Woodall Roofing Contractors of Nashville TN | Copyright 2016 All Rights Reserved Dotdancer.com
ADDRESS Woodall Roofing Contractors 805 52nd Ave. N Nashville, TN 37209
CONTACT 615-300-6005 Fax:  615-352-3644
